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Neon Diamond Cowl: A Free Pattern

Today’s post is a short one! I hope everyone has had a wonderful Easter long weekend. Despite it being rather hectic for me, I found the time to finish up a pattern design I’ve been working on.

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Introducing the “Neon Diamond Cowl“. This is a DK weight textured colourwork cowl that is knit in the round, twisted, and then sewn together at the end. I hope you enjoy it. I have tried to ensure that the pattern is error-free, but if you notice any mistakes, or require assistance, feel free to message me on the blog, or on Ravelry. My username is Hoodedfang.

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It’s Not Knitting!

It seems like I’ve gone all sorts of crafty crazy this past week, and I’ve needed something a little different from my normal ‘knit-all-the-things’ therapy to fill the void. Don’t get me wrong, knitting is still the thing that I crave to be doing every waking moment when my hands aren’t otherwise engaged, but I think in the aftermath of Christmas knitting, and a brief bit of knitting for hire, even I, a self-diagnosed compulsive knitting addict, need a slight change.

It is important that I give myself a brief respite. It would be devastating to my sanity for my knitting to become chore-like, as it is my salvation from many worldly anxieties, tedious subway rides, and infrequent long waits in doctors’ offices. And I haven’t even given up knitting completely on this ‘break’ either; I’ve managed to add a few inches to the boyfriend’s “late and getting later” Christmas present, Jared Flood’s Timberline cardigan, and I’m also carrying around Alexis Winslow’s Arrowhead Mittens when commuting (knitting is magical; it makes public transit almost bearable). But over the past week, I have been rediscovering an old crafty love I had forgotten about, and that love is sewing.

What started off as a knitting related sewing experiment ( I was only attempting to make a cute project bag for the aforementioned Arrowhead Mittens) ended up allputtogetherbecoming a full scale garment construction project. I started off by following the Lined Drawstring Bag tutorial from Jeni Baker’s  In Colour Order, using three fat quarters to create two adorable project bags for small knitting projects. The pattern is incredibly easy to follow, and the bag is simple to put together. Inside

I resisted the urge to run out to the nearest fabric store and buy up as many fat quarters as I could lay my hands on, and instead decided that I might set the bar a little higher and attempt to make a skirt.

There is this little independent clothing shop near my apartment that sells wonderful vintage inspired clothing, and a few months ago they had this beautiful turquoise and black polka dotted full circle skirt with a shaped waistband. I seriously coveted it, but they only had one remaining and it was a size xs, so while covet it I might, wear it I could not. A few weeks ago, they moved the skirt to the front window of the shop, as if they were trying to taunt me with what I could not have. But this got me thinking, certainly if I could manage to make a bag, I could also make a skirt, right?

So on the weekend I headed down to The Workroom, and had the ladies in the store steer me towards some appropriate materials. There were a few options for patterns, but I ended up selecting Victory Patterns Madeleine for the skirt, and a nice chambray fabric to construct it out of. With all my bits and bobs paid for, I headed home for an afternoon of sewing. Pattern

The original Madeleine pattern is designed with exterior pockets, suspenders, and a straight waistband. I opted to forgo the pockets and suspenders, and changed the waistband to the shaped style I had been coveting. I wasn’t a hundred percent sure how to modify the waistband, and my Pinterest searches turned out to be fruitless, so I improvised by folding the waistband pattern blueprint for the size I wanted in half, and then added the shaped peaks to the centre in scrap pattern paper. Instead of cutting only one waist piece, I cut two, added interfacing to both, placed right sides together, and sewed them together along the shaped edge. I then followed the pattern as written for the remainder of the waistband. Finished Skirt

I am actually pretty pleased with how it turned out. I am not embarrassed to wear it out in public, which is more than I can say for some of the creations I sewed together in my high school days.

Joni

And like a creature from the black lagoon I have found my way back to the bog…I mean…blog, with really bad puns.

I get those from my father.

I get a lot of stuff from my father. Genetics, migraines, a love of history, a hard time…and a love of music.

My father tends to like what we now call “classic rock” although I guess he may have just called it “rock” in the past…him being…classic and all.

He has always introduced me to classic rock, which led me to my own discovery of music and my metaphoric introduction to Joni Mitchell somewhere along the way. I think she is fabulous and her lyrics can make me cry. (I’d say they speak to my soul, if I didn’t think you’d classify me as melodramatic.)

Anyways, I’ve got a nifty little Joni Mitchell inspired headband pattern to share with Y’all! (I’m wearing my cowboy boots at the moment so I feel entitled to pretend to be western although the closest I’ve come to a cow or a horse in the last decade would be the commute down Highway 11 from work to home or the cottage.)

Joni :  JoniPattern

Happy Knitting!

Leigh

My Morning Crossword Cowl

Well I’ve managed to fix the cabling on my socks and now I love them! I’ve also had the opportunity to work out a new pattern for a cowl. My brother gave me two skeins of a Aslan Trends Royal Alpaca in the colourway Crimson for Christmas which have made the cowl super soft and luxurious and I added some buttons for a little bit of whimsy. This is the pattern for it, I hope you enjoy! My Morning Crossword Cowl

Hibou

So a while ago I mentioned that I was designing one of the hats for Christmas Dinner myself. It was made for Kate, who loves owls, and also speaks French…hence the name “Hibou”. It was my first attempt at designing any kind of charting, but I think it turned out just fine. I think the owl is ADORABLE…but I might be biased… here is the pattern if you’re interested: HibouHat

This is the photo of it:

Black River Rapid Fingerless Mitts

So I made myself a pair of socks out of a skein of Malabrigo Sock yarn a while ago, and ended up with roughly 120 extra yards of yarn left over. In the middle of the “Christmas Hat Project,” (which I’ll explain another time, but for now just accept that I’ve been making a lot of individualised hats,) I returned to the leftover yardage in search of a quick and hat-distracting project. After scanning Ravelry for fingerless mitt patterns, I couldn’t find one that ‘clicked’ with whatever knitting mood I was in at the time. So I decided to set out on that very scary expedition… and designed my own pattern. I think it worked out pretty well, I’m partial to the finished product. I’m in the process of turning my notes into a real written pattern that other people can understand, although this is my first attempt at writing a pattern, and really, I’m finding that the knitting part of the whole endeavour was way easier. Here are some basic photos of the mitts, I’ll find someone else to model them for me later…nothing like trying to take a picture and model at the same time.

So here is the pattern: Keep in mind, its my first one ever.

Black River Rapid Fingerless Mitts

 

Malabrigo Sock Yarn (or any fingering weight yarn of your choice)

2.5 DPNS or circulars

Yarn Needle

Cable Needle

 

M1 – I lifted and twisted the bar between the stitches from the row below, you can use whatever method you like to increase the stitches.

 

For both Left and Right Mitten

C/O 52 stitches, divide evenly over dpns and join for working in the round, be careful not to twist.

 

Work (k2, P2) ribbing for one inch.

 

Left Mitten

 

Row 1: K24, *slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in front of work, knit the next 4 stitches, then knit the 2 from cable needle, K2* 3 times, knit to end of round.

 

Rows 2-6: Knit all stitches

 

Row 7: K24, *slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in front of work, knit the next 4 stitches, then knit the 2 from cable needle, K2* 3 times, knit to end of round.

 

Rows 8-12: Knit all stitches

 

Row 13: K8, M1, K1, M1, K23, *slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in front of work, knit the next 4 stitches, then knit the 2 from cable needle, K2* 2 times, knit to end of round.

 

Row 14: Knit all stitches

 

Row 15: K8, M1, K3, M1, Knit to end of round

 

Row 16: Knit all stitches

 

Row 17: K8, M1, K5, M1, Knit to end of round

 

Row 18: Knit all stitches

 

Row 19: K8, M1, K7, M1, K31, slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in front of work, knit the next 4 stitches, then knit the 2 from cable needle, K2, knit to end of round.

 

Row 20: Knit all stitches

 

Row 21: K8, M1, K9, M1, Knit to end of round

 

Row 22: Knit all stitches

 

Row 23: K8, M1, K11, M1, Knit to end of round

 

Row 24: Knit all stitches

 

Row 25: K8, M1, K13, M1, Knit to end of round

 

Row 26: Knit all stitches

 

Row 27: K8, M1, K15, M1, Knit to end of round

 

Row 28: Knit all stitches

 

Row 29: K8, M1, K17, M1, Knit to end of round

 

Row 30: Knit all stitches

 

Row 31: K8, M1, K19, M1, Knit to end of round

 

Knit all stitches until the thumb gusset reaches the first knuckle on your thumb. Slide 21 stitches of thumb gusset (the stitches created with the M1s) onto a spare circular needle, piece of thread, or a stitch holder.

 

Next Row: Knit to end of round, and increase 1 stitch (52sts for hand) (I hid the increase near the thumb gusset on the inside of palm.)

 

Row 32: K40, *slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in front of work, knit the next 4 stitches, then knit the 2 from cable needle, K2* knit to end of round.

 

Row 33-37: Knit all stitches

 

Row 38: K40, *slip next 2 stitches onto cable needle and hold in front of work, knit the next 4 stitches, then knit the 2 from cable needle, K2* knit to end of round.

 

Row 39: (K2, P2) to end of round.

Continue working in ribbing for one inch, or until desired length.

Cast off using whatever method you prefer. I did: K2tog, slip stitch from right needle back onto left needle, knit it together with next stitch, continue until all stitches are off.

 

Thumb: Place stitches back onto dpns, knit round, making sure to pick up and twist 3 stitches from the inside of hand where it joins for the thumb. You should now have 24 stitches for thumb. Work (K2, P2) ribbing for one inch. Cast off.

 

Right Mitten

Row 1: K4, *slip 4 stitches onto cable needle and hold in back of work, K2, then K4 stitches off cable needle, K2* 3 times, knit to end of round

 

Row s 2-6: Knit all stitches

 

Row 7: K4, *slip 4 stitches onto cable needle and hold in back of work, K2, then K4 stitches off cable needle, K2* 3 times, knit to end of round

 

Rows 8-12: Knit all stitches

 

Row 13: K4, *slip 4 stitches onto cable needle and hold in back of work, K2, then K4 stitches off cable needle, K2* 2 times, K23, M1, K1, M1, K8 (54)

 

Row 14: Knit all stitches

 

Row 15: K43, M1, K3, M1, K8 (56)

 

Row 16: Knit all stitches

 

Row 17: K43, M1, K5, M1, K8 (58)

 

Row 18: Knit all stitches

 

Row 19: K4, *slip 4 stitches onto cable needle and hold in back of work, K2, then K4 stitches off cable needle, K2* once, K31, M1, K7, M1, K8 (60)

 

Row 20: Knit all stitches

 

Row 21: K43, M1, K9, M1, K8 (62)

 

Row 22: Knit all stitches

 

Row 23: K43, M1, K11, M1, K8 (64)

 

Row 24: Knit all stitches

 

Row 25: K43, M1, K13, M1, K8 (68)

 

Row 26: Knit all stitches

 

Row 27: K43, M1, K15, M1, K8 (70)

 

Row 28: Knit all stitches

 

Row 29: K43, M1, K17, M1, K8 (72)

 

Row 30: Knit all stitches

 

Row 31: K43, M1, K19, M1, K8 (74)

 

Knit all stitches until the thumb gusset reaches the first knuckle on your thumb. Slide 21 stitches of thumb gusset (the stitches created with the M1s) onto a spare circular needle, piece of thread, or a stitch holder.

 

Next Row: Knit to end of round, and increase 1 stitch (52sts for hand) (I hid the increase near the thumb gusset on the inside of palm.)

 

Row 32: K4, slip 4 stitches onto cable needle and hold in back of work, K2, then K4 stitches off cable needle, K2 once, knit to end of round

 

Row 33-37: Knit all stitches

 

Row 38: K4, slip 4 stitches onto cable needle and hold in back of work, K2, then K4 stitches off cable needle, K2 once, knit to end of round

 

Row 39: (K2, P2) to end of round.

Continue working in ribbing for one inch, or until desired length.

Cast off using whatever method you prefer.

 

Thumb (Worked the same as for left glove): Place stitches back onto dpns, knit round, making sure to pick up and twist 3 stitches from the inside of hand where it joins for the thumb. You should now have 24 stitches for thumb. Work (K2, P2) ribbing for one inch. Cast off.  Weave in ends, wear and enjoy.